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MILL LOAD - Roll Force, Torque, Power



The Mill Load application is specifically developed for mill design/operation engineers to calculate roll separating force, rolling torque and power, etc. Typically, load calculation is needed for an existing mill when a new rolling process is applied either with higher reduction or in lower temperature or higher speed, or for a stronger material.  This is to make sure the force, torque, etc. are not over equipment capacity. In building a new mill, motor selection, mill size determination and transmission system design, etc. are all based on mill load calculation.

Applications in this section consist of:

This suite of mill applications are based on our sophisticated rolling mill process models, especially those to determine force, torque and power requirement. The model have been developed and continuously improved for the past 20 years with extensive mill test results in Germany and USA, etc. For high accuracy of prediction, every detail involved is carefully determined. For example

  • Projective contact area. Elementary slab method is used by constructing imaginary contour, together with modifications from spread, pass sequence and fill ratio, etc. For some passes, contact area models are used based on experiment results on the shapes of contact areas in various pass sequence. 
  • Mean flow stress. The strain along the contact length ranges from 0 at the entrance, to the max. strain (pass strain) at the exit. A mean (or average) strain is used to achieve high accuracy. Flow stress model is specifically developed for a wide strain rate range 0.05-500/s (applicable up to 3000/s); so the model is sufficient to cover the modern finishing block case with rolling speed over 100m/s.
  • Shape factor (Q factor). This factor covers pass sequence, entry billet shape and contact, etc. The shape factor model used is among those developed through a ten-year rolling process research in a four-stand high-speed continuous mill (speed up to over 70m/s).
  • Lever arm ratio. During torque calculation, experimentally established model for lever arm ratio in each pass sequence is employed, besides the accurate calculation of the roll separating force.

Related Resources
 
    On Rolling Mill Process Modeling - Empirical Models
    Metal Pass Roll Pass Consulting
    Do-It-Yourself Improvement: Ask A Question
    Flow stress and modeling
    Roll pass related US patents

 

 
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